Install this theme
The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day.
David Foster Wallace (via iconsabstract)
She knew it was love when Wallace agreed to go to Hawaii with her early in their relationship. Hawaii represented two of many phobias: air travel, and the possibility of swimming with sharks. While Green was in the ocean, Wallace would routinely stand on the shore, yelling anecdotal statistics about shark attacks at her.
She knew it was love when Wallace agreed to go to Hawaii with her early in their relationship. Hawaii represented two of many phobias: air travel, and the possibility of swimming with sharks. While Green was in the ocean, Wallace would routinely stand on the shore, yelling anecdotal statistics about shark attacks at her.

peterwknox:

David Foster Wallace - Conversation (San Francisco, 2004) (by sdeslimbes)

DFW suggests his short story, Little Expressionless Animals, from The Girl with Curious Hair collection for people to start with, in response to an audience question. Fantastic recording.

philk:

summeromegadeth:

bthny:

this photo of Jason Segal as DFW is going to stay open in a tab for the rest of the day so that I can click back over to it whenever I need a good lol

D F C

philk:

summeromegadeth:

bthny:

this photo of Jason Segal as DFW is going to stay open in a tab for the rest of the day so that I can click back over to it whenever I need a good lol

D F C

What passes for hip cynical transcendence of sentiment is really some kind of fear of being really human, since to be really human […] is probably to be unavoidably sentimental and naïve and goo-prone and generally pathetic.
Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace (via iconsabstract)
Ghosts talking to us all the time — but we think their voices are our own thoughts.
David Foster Wallace in a draft of “Good Old Neon,” a short story published in Oblivion: Stories (2004) (via D.T. Max’s Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, p. 324 (Notes))

Every first Wednesday of the month at 6:00 p.m., the Fireside Room at the Sorrento Hotel goes quiet and fills with people—crazy-haired, soft-spoken, inscrutable, dorky, NPRish, punk, white, black. The reading public. It fills right away, all these people who don’t know each other, and they sit very closely, sometimes three strangers to a couch. By 7:00 p.m., you can’t get a seat.

The party spills into the foyer—there’s a table for chess or whatever near the elevator, and two people sitting there, staring into books. A reporter for the Shoreline Community College newspaper showed up the last time to ask about the event, but it’s not much of an event: Nothing happens. No one ever addresses the room. No one reads anything at you through a microphone. You just sit and read and get waited on, and leave whenever you feel like it. And Manhattans are on special.

My friend Caro sent me a great article about a monthly reading party in Seattle. My family always called sitting around in my parents’ room reading our respective books and papers a reading party, but I guess this sounds just as cool, or, with a Manhattan, maybe even a little better. Portland had something similar several years ago, and I’m thinking of reviving that tradition. (via drydenlane)
brevetcaptain:

theparisreview:

“dfw: I don’t think irony’s meant to synergize with anything as heartfelt as sadness. I think the main function of contemporary irony is to protect the speaker from being interpreted as naive or sentimental.”
From 1996, David Foster Wallace talks literature in an Internet chatroom.

DFW ARB
Not only is the article good and the full transcript better, but there’s a link to 30 DFW essays and stories. Great stuff.

brevetcaptain:

theparisreview:

“dfw: I don’t think irony’s meant to synergize with anything as heartfelt as sadness. I think the main function of contemporary irony is to protect the speaker from being interpreted as naive or sentimental.”

From 1996, David Foster Wallace talks literature in an Internet chatroom.

DFW ARB

Not only is the article good and the full transcript better, but there’s a link to 30 DFW essays and stories. Great stuff.